Art

 

Curriculum Intent

The purpose of the Art curriculum at STMCA is to master the skills and techniques required to create skilful, exciting, refined outcomes using a range of two and three dimensional media.  They are encouraged to question what the purpose of art is in society and what actually constitutes ‘art’.  Students develop their own opinions and understanding of what makes a good piece of art for them.  They are taught the importance of how to express their own ideas and opinions. Once skills and techniques have been explored, analysed and mastered, students use this new knowledge to convey their ideas and insights through their work.  Through all projects, students make links with the KS4 assessment criteria to ensure they are well prepared and understand it if they choice it for their option choice in KS4.

Students experience:

-How to question visual language and support opinions with credible examples

-Make connections between art movements and historical/cultural events, developing understanding in how art works influence society by changing opinions, instilling values and translating experiences across space and time. Research has shown art affects the fundamental sense of self. Painting, sculpture, music, literature and the other arts are often considered to be the source of a society’s collective memory.

-Developing a rich cultural capital awareness and understanding.

-Explore key Art pieces and develop skills in analysing and expressing opinions using artistic tier 3 terminology and vocabulary.

-Understanding the idea of art for art’s sake.

KS3

Years 7, 8 and 9 follow a curriculum that responds to the National Curriculum for art which stipulates:

‘Art, craft and design embody some of the highest forms of human creativity. A high-quality art and design education should engage, inspire and challenge pupils, equipping them with the knowledge and skills to experiment, invent and create their own works of art, craft and design. As pupils progress, they should be able to think critically and develop a more rigorous understanding of art and design. They should also know how art and design both reflect and shape our history, and contribute to the culture, creativity and wealth of our nation.’

The national curriculum for art and design aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • produce creative work, exploring their ideas and recording their experiences
  • become proficient in drawing, painting, sculpture and other art, craft and design techniques
  • evaluate and analyse creative works using the language of art, craft and design
  • know about great artists, craft makers and designers, and understand the historical and cultural development of their art forms.

Pupils should be taught to develop their creativity and ideas, and increase proficiency in their execution. They should develop a critical understanding of artists, architects and designers, expressing reasoned judgements that can inform their own work.

Pupils should be taught:

  • to use a range of techniques to record their observations in sketchbooks, journals and other media as a basis for exploring their ideas
  • to use a range of techniques and media, including painting
  • to increase their proficiency in the handling of different materials
  • to analyse and evaluate their own work, and that of others, in order to strengthen the visual impact or applications of their work
  • about the history of art, craft, design and architecture, including periods, styles and major movements from ancient times up to the present day

 

The curriculum builds on exploring knowledge and techniques as their experiences develop. It focuses on students mastering an understanding of the visual elements and principles of art; tone, line, colour, pattern, shape, form, texture, space, balance, unity, harmony, emphasis, movement, repetition, rhythm, proportion and variety. It also includes engaging with and developing understanding of art through time, its place in history, along with art from other cultures.  Three dimensional making skills using card construction and ceramics making techniques allow students to develop a more three dimensional visual language.

Previous study from Primary school and KS2, varies in experience from school to school due to the specialist nature of the subject. The National Curriculum for KS2 offers teachers the opportunities to explore art, craft and design in a varieties of broad ways.  We make sure that during year 7 students have the opportunities to explore and understand the basic visual elements and principles of art, craft and design. Students are taught in their mixed ability form classes and have one lesson per week.

Threaded into the KS3 experience are opportunities to explore topics in photography.  This is new media for the department as we are now able to offer GCSE Photography at KS4. It provides students with an opportunity to explore basic ideas and principles before they reach the KS4 option choices.

Assessment is completed through teacher assessment of on–going work and through the common assessments which are moderated within the department.

End of year examinations are used to support summative assessment in the summer term. These are used to provide an indication of a students’ ability to perform under examination conditions and to help assess an individual’s depth of understanding.

From the very beginning of year 7 students are taught about the health and safety aspects of working in art rooms and using a variety of materials and processes safely and respectfully. Along with this, they are taught about the need for high levels of co-operation and teamwork, they are given opportunities to develop both practical and social skills.  Opportunities for creating independent learning are integral to projects.

 

KS4

  • Specification- AQA GCSE Art and Design 8202 Fine Art
  • A two year course – students build on the experiences from the KS3 art and design curriculum
  • Fine art practice is defined here as the need to explore an idea, convey an experience or respond to a theme or issue of personal significance. Areas of study In Component 1 and Component 2 students are required to work in one or more area(s) of fine art, such as those listed below: • drawing • painting • sculpture • installation • lens-/light-based media • photography and the moving image • printmaking • mixed media • land art. They may explore overlapping areas and combinations of areas. Knowledge, understanding and skills Students must develop and apply the knowledge, understanding and skills within the context of fine art practice and their selected area(s) of study.
  • The following aspects of the knowledge, understanding and skills are defined in further detail to ensure students’ work is clearly focused and relevant to fine art.
  • Knowledge and understanding:

The way sources inspire the development of ideas, relevant to fine art including: • how sources relate to individual, social, historical, environmental, cultural, ethical and/or issues-based contexts how ideas, themes, forms, feelings and concerns can inspire personally determined responses that are primarily aesthetic, intellectual or conceptual.

  • The ways in which meanings, ideas and intentions relevant to fine art can be communicated including the use of: • figurative representation, abstraction, stylisation, simplification, expression, exaggeration and imaginative interpretation • visual and tactile elements, such as: • colour • line • form • tone • texture • shape • composition • rhythm
  • scale • structure • surface.
  • Within the context of fine art, students must demonstrate the ability to: • use fine art techniques and processes, appropriate to students’ personal intentions, for example: • mark-making • monoprint, collagraph and block printing • assemblage • construction • carving • film and video • digital working methods • use media and materials, as appropriate to students’ personal intentions, for example: • charcoal, pastels, pen and ink, crayons and pencil • watercolour, gouache, acrylic and oil paint • found materials • clay, wood and metal • digital imagery • different papers and surfaces on which to work.
  • Students explore a wide range of making techniques, processes and artists, designers and makers. Create work in two and three dimensions that follow through the design process.
  • inspire, challenge and motivate every student, no matter what their level of ability, while supporting you in developing creative and engaging lessons.
  • The qualification provides scope for innovation and curriculum development and offers you opportunities to tailor courses of study to the individual needs of your students.
  • With two components, comprising a ‘Portfolio’ selected from the course of study and an ‘Externally set assignment’, the specification provides your students with a range of creative, exciting and stimulating opportunities to develop and explore their personal interests in art and design.
  • It allows for progression from Key Stage 3 whilst providing a strong foundation for further study at AS and A-level as well as vocational pathways. To support this progression, the assessment objectives, structure and titles are very similar to those detailed in the AS and A-level Art and Design specification.
  • The specification has been designed to allow students to develop knowledge and understanding during the course through a variety of learning experiences and approaches, including engagement with sources. This will allow them to develop the skills to explore, create and communicate their own ideas.
  • Students will demonstrate these skills through the development, refinement, recording, realisation and presentation of their ideas through a portfolio and by responding to an externally set assignment.

What grades are available?

The GCSE course is worth a full GCSE with a grade from 1-9. Grade 9 being the top grade.

AQA GCSE Photography 8206

Photography is defined here as the practice of producing images using light-sensitive materials such as photographic film, or digital methods of development and production to create static or moving images.

In Component 1 and Component 2 students are required to work in one or more area(s) of photography, such as those listed below:

  • portraiture
  • location photography
  • studio photography
  • experimental imagery
  • installation
  • documentary photography
  • photo-journalism
  • moving image: film, video and animation
  • fashion photography.

They may explore overlapping areas and combinations of areas. The way sources inspire the development of ideas, relevant to photography including:

  • how sources relate to historical, contemporary, social, cultural and issues-based contexts and external considerations such as those associated with the cultural industries and client-oriented requirements
  • how ideas, themes, subjects and feelings can inspire creative responses informed by different styles, genres and aesthetic considerations and/or an individual’s distinctive view of the world.

The ways in which meanings, ideas and intentions relevant to photography can be communicated include the use of:

  • figurative and non-figurative forms, image manipulation, close up, and imaginative interpretation
  • visual and tactile elements such as:
    • colour
    • line
    • form
    • tone
    • texture
    • shape
    • pattern
    • composition
    • scale
    • sequence
    • surface
    • contrast.

Within the context of photography, students must demonstrate the ability to use photographic techniques and processes, appropriate to students’ personal intentions, for example:

    • lighting
    • viewpoint
    • aperture
    • depth of field
    • shutter speed and movement
    • use of enlarger
    • chemical and/or digital processes
  • use media and materials, as appropriate to students’ personal intentions, for example:
    • film
    • photographic papers
    • chemicals appropriate to darkroom practices
    • digital media, programs and related technologies
    • graphic media for purposes such as storyboarding, planning and constructing shoots.
  • Students explore a wide range of making techniques, processes and photographers, artists and designers.
  • The qualification provides scope for innovation and curriculum development and offers opportunities to tailor courses of study to the individual needs of students.
  • With two components, comprising a ‘Portfolio’ selected from the course of study and an ‘Externally set assignment’, the specification provides students with a range of creative, exciting and stimulating opportunities to develop and explore their personal interests in photography.
  • It allows for progression from Key Stage 3 whilst providing a strong foundation for further study at AS and A-level as well as vocational pathways. To support this progression, the assessment objectives, structure and titles are very similar to those detailed in the AS and A-level Photography specification.
  • The specification has been designed to allow students to develop knowledge and understanding during the course through a variety of learning experiences and approaches, including engagement with sources. This will allow them to develop the skills to explore, create and communicate their own ideas.
  • Students will demonstrate these skills through the development, refinement, recording, realisation and presentation of their ideas through a portfolio and by responding to an externally set assignment.

Curriculum Implementation

  • Excellent teaching delivered by teachers with a deep knowledge of their subject.
  • High expectations at all times and a belief that all students can meet those expectations (taking the ceiling off topics and lessons).
  • Appropriate and tailored support for students on the SEND registers.
  • Develop students key skills of teamwork, leadership, listening, presenting, creativity and problem-solving across the curriculum.
  • An emphasis on the increase of Oracy across all areas of the curriculum to evaluate, analyse and support their creative decisions.
  • An opportunity for all to access the cultural capital this provides.
  • Using a wide variety of materials, processes and strategies as teaching tools to improve the learning for the student both at school and when they are learning at home.
  • A flexible curriculum which allows students to follow their talent and interests as well as providing extra support and challenge, emphasised at KS4.
  • Coordination between subjects so that students have rich opportunities to draw on knowledge and skills from across the curriculum within each subject.
  • Data and a personal knowledge of the student used to produce lessons that will stimulate and engage them enabling students across the academic spectrum to be challenged and stretched.
  • Assessment strategically planned into schemes of learning enabling teachers to give high quality feedback to students and parents and using the student/parent/school partnership to support the development of the student.
  • Extra curricular workshops at lunchtime and after school for students to be able to continue their work and use materials that might not be practical to take home.
  • Weekly extra curricular offers of More Creativity art group, Photography, Clay Club-working with BCB (British Ceramics Biennial) artists
  • We offer the Arts Award-Bronze, Silver & Gold qualifications, recognised qualification in conjunction with the Arts Council.
  • Students encouraged to be truly independent learners.
  • The curriculum is regularly evaluated in order to ensure that it meets the needs of our learners’ development.
  • We loan art equipment to students so that they are able to continue studies outside of the classroom.
  • We have cameras available to support the delivery of GCSE Photography

 

End of Course Assessment

What grades are available?

Both GCSE courses, Fine Art and GCSE Photography are worth a full GCSE with a grade from 1-9. Grade 9 being the top grade.

How will I be assessed?

The GCSE courses follow the 9-1 grading system. Grade 9 is the highest grade.

  • 60% Portfolio: A project that contains digital manipulation skills, researching and understanding photographers, designing possible outcomes and creating a final outcome.
  • 40% Externally Set Task: Another project of a different theme, set by the exam board which culminates in a final 10 hour exam period where students complete a final outcome.

Include information about exam board, assessment objectives or learning outcome proportions, structure of exams and if tiers of entry the grade range.

Career Links

    

St Thomas More has its very own dedicated careers team.  To find out more about careers at St Thomas More, please click here. 

 

Tips and Advice

Serious about taking art as an option? Then you need to be creative, dedicated, determined to succeed and able to work independently.

KS3 Art and Design – BBC Bitesize

GCSE Art and Design – BBC Bitesize

Photography – Photography – GCSE Art and Design Revision – BBC Bitesize

Arts Award

Arts Council England |

BBC Arts – BBC Arts

Welcome (studentartguide.com)

Tate Kids

Art UK | Home

Sky Arts-Portrait artist of the Year

-Landscape artist of the Year

-The Art of Architecture

– Many more art related programmes

The Potteries Museum and Art Gallery

 

We loan equipment to students and offer workshops at lunchtime and after school for students to be able to continue their work and use materials that might not be practical to take home.

Having access to your own drawing and painting equipment is always a good investment if you are serious about developing independent skills in art and design.

We recommend you have your own DSLR camera for GCSE Photography although we do also have some in school for use. Camera phones can also be very useful, but will not develop the technical element of the GCSE.

This may include book recommendations, additional equipment required, TV programmes to support learning and local locations to visit.

 

Further Information

Twitter @artdeptSTMCA

National Curriculum for Art and Design

AQA | Art and Design | GCSE | Art and Design   This is also the link for GCSE Photography as it is a part of the Art and Design Suite.

 

Subject Leader Information

For more information or if you have any questions please use the contact details below.

Mrs K Jones – Subject Leader kjones@stmca.org.uk

 

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